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Know This

Responding to Cyberbullying: Top Ten Tips for Educators

| September 30, 2016 at 06:23 am

Top ten for teachers

 

  • Thoroughly investigate all incidents so that you can direct resources and, if necessary, discipline to students who require it.

 

  • Enlist the support of a school liaison officer or another member of law enforcement to help, especially when it involves a possible threat to the safety of your students or staff.

 

  • Once you identify the offending party, develop a response that is commensurate with the harm done and the disruption that occured.

 

  • Work with parents to convey to the student that cyberbullying behaviors are taken seriously and will not be tolerated at your school.

 

  • Instruct parents to contect an attorney. Some instances of cyberbullying just don’t fall under the purview of the school. In these cases, parents may want to pursue other avenues for redress. All states allow for parties to sue others in civil court for haeassment, international infliction of emotional distress, or a number of other torts.

 

  • Contact cell pone providers if threats or explicit content are transmitted via theses devices. These companies keep data that may serve as evidence on their servers for a limited period of time before deleting it.

 

  • Keep all evidence of cyberbullying. Keep a file with screen shots, message logs, or any other evidence so that you can demonstrate the seriousness of the behavior and its impact on the school. This is especially critical if you intend to formally punish students (e.g., suspension, expulsion).

 

  • Contact and work with MySpace, Facebook or any other web enviroment where bullying ocurred. By now they are used to working through cyberbullying cases and can be a resource to assist you in removing offending content, gathering evidence, or put you in touch with someone who can help.

 

  • Solicit advice from neighboring schools or districts about incidents they may have dealt with in the past.

 

  • Use creative informal response strategies, particularly for relatively minor forms of cyberbullying that do not result in significant harm. For example, students may be required to create anti-cyberbullying posters to be displayed throughout the school. Older students might be required to give a brief presentation to younger students about the importance of responsibly using technology. It is important to condemn the behavior while sending a message to the rest of the school community that bullying in any form is wrong.

 

Source: Cyberbullying.org

What To Do When Your Child Cyberbullies Others: Top Ten Tips for Parents

| September 29, 2016 at 06:07 am

Cyberbully

 

1.- Acknowledge the issue. As a parent, accept the reality that your child could be engaging in online behaviors that are hurting others. Rather than try to trivialize, rationalize, or ignore the problem at hand, you realize that anyone (including your own flesh and blood!) can be very cruel to others, given the right circumstances.

2.- Remain calm. When addressing cyberbullying, try to discuss the issue in a level-headed manner without demonizing, disrespecting, or judging your child. Remember that your son or daughter isn’t the problem; it is the behavior. Deal with it, but treat them with dignity. Otherwise, they may lash out and retaliate if they feel attacked or victimized themselves, and no progress will be made.

3.- Keep an open line of communication. Many youth engage in cyberbullying to get revenge for something someone else did first. Make sure that your kids know they can come to you and discuss issues they are having with peers (offline or online). Give kids the opportunity and skillset to solve interpersonal problems in appropriate ways, instead of resorting to revenge.

4.- Stop the bullying. Goal #1 is to get the bullying to end and never happen again. Ensure that all instances of bullying are stopped immediately, regardless of who started it. No one deserves to be mistreated, for any reason, ever.

5.- Understand the root of the problem. We hear that “hurt people hurt people.” It is critical to identify the reason(s) your child has acted out. Is it an unhealthy way of coping with stress in their life? Because they themselves are being victimized? Because there are no rules in place, and no threat of sanctions to deter them? Try to get to the bottom of the issue.

6.- Investigate. Take measures to thoroughly find out the extent of your child’s bullying. It could span multiple environments, websites, apps, and devices. It could be very direct and observable, or indirect and extremely subtle. Work to get to the bottom of what exactly happened.

7.- Make children understand how targets feel. Explain the severity of cyberbullying and how it would feel to be on the receiving end of hate or harassment that specifically highlights the way your child would be hurt the most. Try to cultivate empathy and compassion in kids in creative and compelling ways, so that they really understand that we all have our sore spots, hot buttons, and vulnerabilities.

8.- Set up parental controls. Monitor your child’s online activities, both formally and informally. This can be done through the installation of software or apps on their laptop, tablet, or phone. You should also routinely and randomly check their devices to see what they are doing, at least until you feel sure that they can be trusted.

9.- Share your concerns. You are not the only parent who has ever faced these problems. Connect with others so that the entire community can rally around the issue and take a stand. This united front can help to create and promote a culture where all members of a peer group recognize that bullying is always wrong and not cool at all.

10.- Stay educated. While we know that your lives are extremely busy, it is important that you take the time to continually learn about new technologies and sites that your kids (and their peers) are using. You should also know where to get help (start with cyberbullying.org), and interface with others (especially school staff) who have relevant experiences and strategies to share.

 

Source: Cyberbullying.org

 

 

 

What is Cyberbullying?

| September 28, 2016 at 07:41 am

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Electronic technology includes devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers, and tablets as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites.

Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or emails, rumors sent by email or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

Why Cyberbullying is Different

Kids who are being cyberbullied are often bullied in person as well. Additionally, kids who are cyberbullied have a harder time getting away from the behavior.

  • Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and reach a kid even when he or she is alone. It can happen any time of the day or night.
  • Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to trace the source.
  • Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent.

Effects of Cyberbullying

Cell phones and computers themselves are not to blame for cyberbullying. Social media sites can be used for positive activities, like connecting kids with friends and family, helping students with school, and for entertainment. But these tools can also be used to hurt other people. Whether done in person or through technology, the effects of bullying are similar.

Kids who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Be unwilling to attend school
  • Receive poor grades
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Have more health problems

 Frequency of Cyberbullying

The 2013-2014 School Crime Supplement (National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics) indicates that 7% of students in grades 6–12 experienced cyberbullying.

The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey finds that 15% of high school students (grades 9-12) were electronically bullied in the past year.

Research on cyberbullying is growing. However, because kids’ technology use changes rapidly, it is difficult to design surveys that accurately capture trends.

Souce: Stopbullying.gov

Bullying and Cyberbullying at a glance

| September 27, 2016 at 05:08 am

Cyberbullying

Bullying is behaviour that hurts someone else – such as name calling, hitting, pushing, spreading rumours, threatening or undermining someone.

It can happen anywhere – at school, at home or online. It’s usually repeated over a long period of time and can hurt a child both physically and emotionally.

Bullying that happens online, using social networks, games and mobile phones, is often called cyberbullying. A child can feel like there’s no escape because it can happen wherever they are, at any time of day or night.

 

Bullying includes:

  • verbal abuse, such as name calling and gossiping
  • non-verbal abuse, such as hand signs or text messages
  • emotional abuse, such as threatening, intimidating or humiliating someone
  • exclusion, such as ignoring or isolating someone
  • undermining, by constant criticism or spreading rumours
  • controlling or manipulating someone
  • racial, sexual or homophobic bullying
  • physical assaults, such as hitting and pushing
  • making silent, hoax or abusive calls
  • online or cyberbullying.

What is online or cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is an increasingly common form of bullying behaviour which happens on social networks, games and mobile phones. Cyberbullying can include spreading rumours about someone, or posting nasty or embarrassing messages, images or videos.

Children may know who’s bullying them online – it may be an extension of offline peer bullying – or they may be targeted by someone using a fake or anonymous account. It’s easy to be anonymous online and this may increase the likelihood of engaging in bullying behaviour.
Cyberbullying can happen at any time or anywhere – a child can be bullied when they are alone in their bedroom – so it can feel like there’s no escape.

 

Source: NSPCC (2016) Childline annual review 2015/16: It turned out someone did care.

Brad Pitt under investigation for child abuse

| September 26, 2016 at 12:21 pm

Brad Pitt - Under investigation

Brad Pitt is under investigation by the LAPD and L.A. County Dept. of Children and Family Services for allegedly getting verbally abusive and physical with his children, and that’s what triggered the divorce … TMZ has learned.

Sources familiar with the situation tell us, BradAngelina and their kids were on a flight last Wednesday when he allegedly got wasted on the private jet. He allegedly went wild, screaming and getting physical with the kids.

We’re told the plane landed at an airport around 8 PM, and witnesses say Pitt continued his rant on the tarmac, and even tried leaving in one of the fuel trucks.

Our sources say someone either on the plane or the tarmac anonymously reported the incident to the L.A. County Dept. of Children and Family Services. We’re told Brad and Angelina have already been interviewed and DCFS plans to interview the kids as well. That investigation is ongoing.

We’re also told the LAPD has the case … which is routine when anyone reports child abuse. We do not know the specifics of the alleged abuse … just that it was supposedly both verbal and physical.

Our sources say this incident triggered Jolie to separate from Brad the next day and file for divorce just days later.

A source close to Brad tells TMZ, “He takes the matter very seriously and says he did not commit any abuse of his children,” adding, “It’s unfortunate that people involved are continuing to present him in the worst possible light.”

Source: TMZ

Man borrowed computer to get 1,000 child abuse pictures

| August 12, 2016 at 06:21 am

William Bawn was found with almost 100 category A images – the most serious – when police seized the device in October.

William Bawn was found with almost 100 category A images - the most serious - when police seized the device in October.  The 21-year-old admitted six charges, including three counts of making indecent images of children.  The judge at Carlisle Crown Court sentenced him to a 20-month jail term, suspended for two years.  He was also ordered to complete a rehabilitation requirement and made subject to a 10-year sexual harm prevention order.  Bawn, of Main Street, Frizington in Cumbria, was prohibited from using any computer equipment not fitted with police monitoring software after a similar conviction in 2014.  The latest offence came to light when a woman complained he had borrowed her computer but refused to give it back.

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Women’s Rights: Arranged Marriages and Pedophilia

| at 05:24 am

Child marriage is not only about poverty is about pervert way of thinking

Oops! I did it again” is a song from the famous American pop singer Britney Spears, and the video tells the story of a man who is rejected for a girl when he asked her to marry him. And what man has not fallen ever in the friend zone?

via GIPHY

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‘Absolute horror’: Gillian Triggs responds to child abuse at NT detention centre on Q&A

| July 8, 2016 at 11:20 am

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April 2016 Update: Annual Safer Schools Seminar

| June 29, 2016 at 11:12 am

Child abuse

On April 23 – 27, CPCR, the Office of Basic Education Commission, and the Ministry of Education hosted an annual seminar focusing on creating safer schools for children. School boards and teacher leaders focused on for main topics: safeguarding in schools, positive discipline, sex education, and appropriate student behavior. They also developed a working plan for 2016.

CPCR invited Ticha na-Nakorn, Director of the Juvenile Observation and Protection Center in Baan Kanchanapisek, to share her experience supporting children in conflict with the law. “Change Your Attitude, Change Your Behavior” was her motto. She designs treatment programa based on child behavior. Family members also played a vital in supporting their children. Ms. na-Nakorn’s work inspired all participants to develop better programs in the future.

 

Source: www.cpcrthailand.org

Powerful Ads Show How The Pain Of Child Abuse Lasts A Lifetime

| June 27, 2016 at 01:37 pm

To highlight how the pain of child abuse lasts a lifetime, Leo Burnett Thailand created two powerful ads for Bangkok-based Center for the Protection of Children’s Rights Foundation that show a young boy and a girl being sexually abused.

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